Best Prebuilt Gaming PCs Under $800

Generally, pre-builts gaming PCs are usually a much crappier deal compared to a custom built PC as the builders have to make a profit, but $800 is sort of a sweet spot for pre-builts.

For some reason, there are a ton of options for pre-built gaming PCs at the ~$800 and $1000 range, and these PCs perform almost as well as an $800 custom build would. These PCs generally have worse quality PSUs, less RAM, and worse storage than what you would be able to build for $800 yourself, but the core components will be on the same caliber. One of the main advantages is you don’t have to worry about having compatible hardware or worries like that.

Without further ado, here are our top picks for the best prebuilt gaming PCs for under $800.

The Top $800 Prebuilt Desktop Gaming PCs

PicturePC 

HP Pavilion Gaming
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2400G
GPU Nvidia GTX 1060 3GB
RAM 8GB DDR4
HDD 1TB HDD
SSD 128GB M.2 SSD
VR Ready? Yes
HP Pavilion Power
CPU Intel i5 7400
GPU Nvidia GTX 1060 3GB
RAM 8GB DDR4
HDD 1TB HDD
VR Ready? Yes
CYBERPOWERPC Gamer Xtreme
CPU Intel i5 8400
GPU AMD RX 580 4GB
RAM 8GB DDR4
HDD 1TB HDD
VR Ready? Yes
Skytech ST-SHADOW-II-002
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 1400
GPU Nvidia GTX 1060 3GB
RAM 16GB DDR4
HDD 1TB HDD
VR Ready? Yes

HP Pavilion 690-0048


CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2400g

GPU AMD RX 580 4GB

RAM 16 GB DDR4

HDD 1TB HDD

SSD 128GB SSD

OS Windows 10

VR Ready? Yes

Pros

Very well balanced

120 GB SSD

16 GB of memory

Cons

Weak CPU

Even though though the HP Pavilion 690-0048 is slightly above $800, we had to include it on this list because it has two things that most other $800 prebuilt PCs don’t have: 16 GB of 2666MHz RAM and an SSD.

It’s also got the RX 580, a respectable GPU that is especially attractive if you monitor has AMD FreeSync.

However, the one big downfall of this prebuilt is the weak CPU. The AMD Ryzen 5 2400G is not a bad CPU, but it gets beaten in both single-core and multi-core performance by the Intel i5 8400.

If you play CPU demanding games or are planning to use your PC as a workstation, the Ryzen 5 2400G might be a big disadvantage.

Despite the relatively poor CPU, this PC still takes our top spot because of its large RAM capacity and SSD.

HP Pavilion Power 580-023w


CPU Intel i5 7400

GPU Nvidia GTX 1060 4GB

RAM 8GB DDR4

HDD 1TB HDD

OS Windows 10

VR Ready? Yes

Pros

Powerful combination if i5 7400 and GTX 1060

Low price

Cons

Only 1 front USB port

Only 8 GB of RAM

If you want an unassuming looking sleeper PC, the HP Pavilion Power is a top choice for you.

It’s got a i5 7400, which is a bit dated as it is only a Kaby Lake processor, but the i5 8400 isn’t a huge performance upgrade over the 7400.

The PC also only has 8 GB of RAM and doesn’t have an SSD, but it’s reasonably affordable so you can spend the money you save on an an SSD or RAM upgrade.

CYBERPOWERPC Gamer Xtreme GXIVR8020A5


CPU Intel i5 8400

GPU AMD RX 580 4GB

RAM 8 GB DDR4

HDD 1TB HDD

OS Windows 10

VR Ready? Yes

Pros

Strong CPU and graphics card

Gorgeous case with LED fans

Free mouse and keyboard

Cons

Low RAM

Th CYBERPOWERPC Gamer Xtreme is a solid gaming PC that actually comes below our budget of $800. It’s got the best CPU of any PC on this list, the i5 8400.

While this PC lacks 16 GB of RAM or an SSD, it’s got a gorgeous acrylic case with four LED fans — definitely better looking than the two HP prebuilts on this list which don’t even have windows.

What to look for in $800 prebuilt

Here are some basic guidelines to follow when you’re looking for a prebuilt PC. Even if you aren’t building your own PC, you still need to have a basic understanding of what PC components you will be getting.

Processor

In most of your applications beside gaming, the processor (CPU) will be the most important component in your PC.

If you plan to use your PC for a lot of non-gaming applications, finding a prebuilt with a good CPU is important.

Strong CPUs on ~$800 prebuilts include the Intel i5 8400, Intel i5 7400, AMD Ryzen 5 2600, and the AMD Ryzen 5 1600.

Graphics Card

The graphics card does most of the work processing graphics in your games, and will single-handedly decide how much FPS you get in games as long as you have a decent CPU.

At the $800 price point, you should be looking to find a PC with either a GTX 1060 or RX 580. It doesn’t really matter which one you get, as they deliver roughly the same performance.

If you somehow find a PC with 6 GB GTX 1060 or a 8 GB RX 580, it’s a good buy.

The RX 570 or RX 480 are slightly weaker than the RX 580, and prebuilts using them won’t be bad deals as long as they are slightly cheaper than their competition.

But stay away from $800 or even $700 prebuilts using something like the GTX 1050Ti — it’s not a very fast graphics card.

Memory (RAM)

Memory is another core component on your PC that you can’t overlook. As programs have become more and more memory hungry in recent years, 8 GB of RAM is really not cutting in anymore.

Sadly, most pre-builts at ~$800 still only have 8 gigabytes of DDR4 RAM.

If you will use your PC as a workstation as well as a gaming rig, it’s a good idea to either look for a pre-built with 16GB of RAM or add more RAM to your PC once you buy it.

Storage

As you probably already know, there’s Hard Drives (HDDs) and Solid State Drives (SSDs).

You probably also know that hard drives are worse than SSDs in every way except for price per GB, which is why they are still more common on lower priced PCs than SSDs.

Generally, pre-builts at $800 won’t have SSDs, but it’s really easy to add an SSD to your build. A basic 240 GB Kingston SSD will only set you back around $40, and is dollar for dollar the best investment you can make in your PC.

In terms of effective speed in general computing tasks (not gaming FPS, though), upgrading from a hard drive to an SSD will make your PC feel much much quicker.

Cases

For some reason, big companies like Dell and HP like to house their pre-built gaming PCs in giant plastic cases without windows.

Smaller PC builders always use cases that are similar to those used in custom builds, with large acrylic or glass panels that allow you to see the components and LED fans inside of the case.

The case is a really important factor in aesthetics of the PC, and if that is something you care about, avoid Dell and HP prebuilts.

Upgrades

Prebuilts can be upgraded basically as easily as any custom PC, so future upgradability is a factor you need to consider when you are looking to buy a pre-built gaming PC.

If the prebuilt has a reliable and high power output PSU (something few prebuilts have), you will be able to upgrade to a more power hungry GPU in the future.

Also, even if the pre-built has little RAM or storage, it’s very easy to just add more as all the motherboards will have extra memory slots as well as SATA ports.

You might also want to look at 19 common mistakes for PC builders NOT to do when first building their gaming PCs.

Be sure to check out our full set of guides for PC builds, we have guides for 1500$, 1000$, 800$, 700$, 600$, 500$, 400$, 300$, 800$ Pre-built and 1000$ pre-built.

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